Press

 
photo by Julia Anrather

photo by Julia Anrather

"LGBTQ Theatre, Emphasis on the Q" in American Theatre Magazine

"“Queer aesthetic—what a whirlwind of color, vibrations, exhilaration, raw energy, and magic,” Pitter writes, in her patently extravagant fashion, in a personal manifesto. “The power of a fist held high, wrapped in fishnet glory and boots strapped up, or the fierce walk of a sleek black suit, heels, and mischievous eye. The soft femme fur of legs unshaved or the perfect polish on his fingernails. Queerness is more than sexuality and gender. I believe it’s a political statement, a way of living and loving relentlessly, of knowing pain and violence and our history of existence—but still fighting for a better world.”

As Pitter puts it in florid detail, queerness is an ideology that stretches far beyond theatrical walls. Again we see her describe it as “relentless,” but we also gain a sense of the utopian aesthetic, the fight for a “better world.” What would this queer utopian world look like? What are the laws of a queer utopia?"

 

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photo by Julia Anrather

photo by Julia Anrather

"DECOLONIZING with Cristina Pitter" an interview with J. Molière

"In dissecting the recent work “decolonizing my vagina”, a one-woman show performed at JACK as part of The Exponential Festival this past January, I found that it would not let itself be dissected. Instead it chose to chase, to haunt me, to worry and wake me. It often sat with me and reminded me of the old adages, the ones I’d hoped to forget. It’s a funny thing to see a piece that is so close that it seemed to live with you all along.

A short description: Cristina Pitter invites us into an incense-soaked den with a table, a white table cloth, an aluminum tub of dirt with weeds therein, and a laundry line to hang the weeds from. We watch her engage in the communal ritual that is ridding herself of hate and allowing herself to be loved. Starr Busby’s heaven-honey songs remind me of skinned knees on Sundays, Brooklyn sunshine, and that certain way black girls have of sighing. Pitter has smartly assembled a team of goddesses for such personal/universal exploration. nicHi douglas choreographs Afro-Caribbean based movement to augment the lyricism of the text and Jordana De La Cruz’s direction highlights these small ceremonies without allowing them to become solemn, so that we the audience remain present in the room. The effect is that of a powerful witch overcome by the ravages and oppression of her ancestry. Pitter dances in dirt, places poems in our hands, and tells stories oh god such stories! White men and women, married or not, all of them called by name in an attempt to exorcise these very names from her body." -